Light in Dark Places

light from oil lamp

“What do you think of God?” I asked a friend as we waited for our turn to enter the operating room. We were still in med school, on our fourth year, and our last week of Anesthesiology rotation. We would later be co-workers in the same clinical department.

Confused that I had brought it up, my friend asked me why I had suddenly gotten too profound. “How we think of God matters. Our ideas of God, whether we believe that He exists or not, whether we think He loves or hates us, shape our lives and define who we are,” I said.

He took it all in. What I said must have struck a cord in his heart because for the next few hours—the OR would be postponed, and we’d be allowed to have a leisurely lunch—it felt as if a dam of unanswered questions and unexplained doubts had been unleashed.

My small, harmless question had overcome my initial awkwardness of Gospel-sharing. I would tell him about how different Christianity is from other religions, and about what the Bible says about salvation, heaven and hell, and the like. My friend would come up to me to ask what I thought of homosexuality or of the death penalty; I’d have the opportunity of telling him about Jesus, as well, and ask him to read passages of Scripture from my iPad.

This, I later learned, would always be the case when I’d bring up theological questions to every day conversations. The people closest to us—usually the people who are with us from 8 to 5, or even longer—are sometimes the people with whom serious conversations are most difficult to initiate. But we must actively seek opportunities for Gospel-flavored exchanges to flourish. I also learned through that experience that sometimes, all we need to do is ask.

We are exhorted to live as God’s ambassadors to otherwise stressful,
dark places filled with many colleagues, some of them good friends,
who do not know Christ personally.

We are called to work—to do everything, “whether we eat or drink” (1 Cor. 10:31)—for God’s glory. Our calling is to be salt and light in our workplaces. We are exhorted to live as God’s ambassadors to otherwise stressful, dark places filled with many colleagues, some of them good friends, who do not know Christ personally.

It is in this familiar environment that we must strive to live differently. We must turn in excellent work. We must submit our deliverables on time. We must come on time. We must be efficient, thorough, and fast, without being ungracious, merciless, and compromising. Our work ethic must be unimpeachable. We must be kind, joyful workers, driven by our aim of pleasing our Father in all that we do.

But we mustn’t also keep our mouths shut. While it is important to live godly lives, it’s equally important to share the Gospel and proclaim it. We must not hide in corners of quiet embarrassment, because the Gospel is “the power of God that brings salvation to everyone who believes” (Rom. 1:16). In a sense, our lives must open doors for the Gospel.

Our work is our ministry. God has placed us where we should be in order to do His bidding. Whatever that is—be it in our sharing the Gospel, or being the most excellent insurance agent, doctor, lawyer, businessman, farmer, or carpenter—we must live with the aim of pursuing all things to magnify God’s holy name. We must “declare the praises of Him who called [us] out of darkness into HIs wonderful light” (1 Peter 2:9).


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Light in Dark Places

By Lance Catedral

Pull-quote:

We are exhorted to live as God’s ambassadors to otherwise stressful, dark places filled with many colleagues, some of them good friends, who do not know Christ personally.

Blurb:

Our work is our ministry. God has placed us where we should be in order to do His bidding. Whatever that is—be it in our sharing the Gospel, or being the most excellent insurance agent, doctor, lawyer, businessman, farmer, or carpenter—we must live with the aim of pursuing all things to magnify God’s holy name. We must “declare the praises of Him who called [us] out of darkness into HIs wonderful light” (1 Peter 2:9).

Passion for the Word

Sept 25 to Oct 01 -- Galatians 3:28 (NASB 1977) "There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus."

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Midweek Poster for September 2017 from the Book of Jonah